Goat Stew

by JR Meats on May 3, 2015

Goat is the most widely consumed red meat, eaten by more than 70% of the world’s population. It is a staple in Africa, Asia, and South/Central America, and a delicacy in a few European countries. The cuisines best known for their use of goat include Middle Eastern, North African, Indian, Pakistani, Mexican and Caribbean. It is sometimes marketed as chevon, a French-derived word. Goat is also occasionally sold as Cabrito, a Spanish word referring to young, milk-fed goat. Many recipes from other countries refer to goat meat as mutton.

Goat has a reputation for strong, gamey flavor, but it can be very mild depending upon how it is raised and prepared. It is very lean, containing less cholesterol and fat than lamb or beef. Many find goat meat to be savory and less sweet than beef, but slightly sweeter than lamb. It can be prepared in a variety of ways, most commonly curried or stewed, but it can also be grilled, fried, or made into sausage or jerky. Because of its leanness, it definitely lends itself to the long braise. There are lots of goat recipes on the internet that you can try. Here’s a simple stew that can be made with meat from the leg or shoulder.

Goat Stew

Goat Stew

Goat Stew

Ingredients
2 medium onions, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
2 large carrots, diced
3 stalks celery, chopped
½ Scotch Bonnet pepper (Jamaican pepper), seeded and chopped (can substitute jalapeno or other hot pepper)
2 pounds goat meat, cut into chunks (save bone for stew if using a bone-in cut)
Salt and pepper
¼ cup olive oil
¼ cup butter
1 6 ounce can tomato paste
1 cup stock or red wine, plus 1 cup stock or water
2 tomatoes, chopped (optional)
2 tablespoons chopped parsley (optional)

1. Earlier in the day, combine onions, garlic, carrots, celery and pepper in a large bowl. Season meat with salt and pepper, and toss with vegetables. Cover and marinate in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours, the longer the better.
2. Heat the oil and butter in a large dutch oven or pot, and add the meat and veggie mixture, browning all sides of the meat and cooking for a few minutes to integrate flavors. Add the tomato paste and stock, bring to a boil, then cover and reduce heat to low. If you have the bone (using a leg or bone-in roast meat), add to the pot for flavor.
3. Simmer until meat is fork tender, at least 2 hours, checking occasionally to make sure there is adequate liquid in the pot. Add stock, water or wine as needed to keep from scorching.
4. When meat is tender, add chopped tomato and parsley and serve.
5. This recipe can also be cooked in a crock pot, 6-8 hours on medium.

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